The Ignored World of SAP Cyber Security: How organizations are waking up to attacks targeting their SAP cyber-layer

By now I am sure you have seen the public posting with details and a how-to guide regarding an exploitable SAP vulnerability in a major organizations’ internet facing website. It is always disheartening to see a company exposed in this way. It is a cliché (though truth be told I tend to think clichés have an element of truth to them) but when I read about this type of event and the recent Target breach I look for the teachable moment or lessons I can learn. Good security is an ounce of prevention and a dash of luck, and the more you can learn about appropriate preventions the less luck you will need.

When thinking about this event I actually thought of five teachable elements I can use to provide support for my security approach and philosophy. I wanted to start a discussion about SAP and security, something which has only recently been discussed, and review the silent points from what has occurred thanks to the Full Disclosure posting and WooYun report from the Chinese hacker known as Finger.

This event touches on a couple important areas:

  1. Responsible disclosure

In the posting they cite the date 2013-11-21 as when they submitted a report to the vendor and 2014-01-05 as the date they published the details of the vulnerability and how to exploit it on NVIDIA’s servers, despite the vulnerability not having been addressed, due to a lack of a response. This is less than two months (during a busy holiday season) and it is unclear how many times they attempted to contact the security team. While I agree that it is important to get vulnerability information public so issues can be addressed I think it is more important to do so responsibly. Typically attackers/cyber criminals have less change control processes to go through and can weaponize and take advantage of this information long before organizations have been able to test and apply the remediation across their environment. In fact Mariano Nunez, Onapsis CEO, has said “It is critical when you have information that could cause harm to companies effected that you make best efforts to ensure that information is communicated to those companies along with the information needed to remediate those issues before making that information publicly known.”

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Abusing File Sending Privileges in BusinessObjects Launch Pad

One of the features of BusinessObjects Launch Pad (formerly InfoView) is the ability to send a file to another user. By default, there are no restrictions on the types of files that can be sent. This can be handy on a Penetration Test when you might have Guest privileges and like to target specific users (e.g. the Administrator Group).

1. Login to the InfoView application. Go to Documents tab, New > Local Document. Make sure to add a convincing description. 2. Right click on the file and go to Send > ‘BI Inbox’ . Select who the file will be sent to. Notice, in the screenshot below we have selected the Administrators group. The ‘Use Specific Name’ field at the bottom can be used to rename the file. In this case we rename the file to ImportantDocument.zip (a similarly agnostic file type). In the third screenshot we show the file arriving with the title ImportantDocument.zip (rather than SuperSweetPayload.exe as it was originally named).

A Note on Defense:
An administrator can limit the types of files that can be uploaded using the CMC. In particular, limit the “Agnostic” file type to prevent executables.

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A Simple Method for Fingerprinting SAP BusinessObjects

The main component of a BusinessObjects installation is the Central Management Server (CMS). It’s rarely changed and default TCP port is 6400. A simple way to identify if you are communicating with a BusinessObjects installation is to make a socket connection to the remote server and send the string ‘aps’. If everything is running correctly you should receive the IOR of the CMS.

Note that the hostname of the server is given at the end of the response which is useful in further attacks. Furthermore, if you parse the IOR you will get the IP and port of the CMS’s dynamic listening port which can be added to your Reconnaissance data.

A note on Defense

The most critical point of prevention is firewalling the CMS from unauthorized connections.

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Security Geeks Introduction to SAP – SAProuter and you

There has been a lot of attention in the news recently about vulnerabilities in SAProuter and how these vulnerabilities could be leveraged. The news spun out of a report that a piece of malware was actively learning about SAP systems known to any PC the malware infected. We wrote about this malware and the possible implications in a recent blog post; but the summary is it seems that the professional bad guy community is starting to take an interest in SAP.

So what is the SAProuter? It is a lot like the name suggests; an application produced by SAP which facilitates, logs (if enabled) and filters communications and network connections between different SAP systems, or between a SAP system and other networks or resources. However it is not a gateway/firewall technology; it only filters communications if the clients are configured to send their communication to the router; and not directly to the end point.

Because of this it should be used in conjunction with a firewall; or else a user who the SAProuter is configured to deny access to a specific backend SAP system could simply manually reconfigure their SAP client to attempt to connect directly with the sensitive SAP systems and start interacting with them directly; bypassing all the ACLs and controls in the SAProuter. A firewall is required to block those direct connections and only allow users to access SAP systems via SAProuter; thus allowing the SAProuter’s rules to be enforced (and connections to be logged).

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How Malware is evolving into the first step of attacks against SAP systems

When I talk to CISOs and other business leaders who are responsible for critical applications that rely on SAP a common question I get is how I would quantify the threat to their SAP systems. We talk about stories that have been shared with them by their colleagues, and the importance and value of following best practices. This morning I have been sharing with them an article showing some apparent reconnaissance activities being taken to discover deployed SAP systems.

The article describes a newly discovered Trojan that primarily targets gaining access to victims online banking accounts. What this malware does that is setting of alarm bells for everyone who is responsible for SAP systems is it analyses each machine the malware runs on to determine if that end user computer is used to communicate with SAP systems. This information is then passed back to the owners of the malware.

So what kind of information are we talking about? A PC with a SAP client installed will have configuration information for that client stored locally. This will contain at least the IP address of the SAP servers that the client connects to. If these clients are configured to login automatically those credentials are obtainable; if not then it is a simple matter to hook the application and capture the password the next time the user logs in.

Now, for those people who are itching to tell  me that they don’t care is an external attacker learns the IP address of their internal SAP systems because they cannot reach these systems I would refer you to this blog post; which debunks the myth of “internal” systems. I’d also point out the reason why the attacker is able to learn the IP addresses of your internal SAP systems if because they have taken control of an internal machine on your network already. Of course if you think I am wrong then you are gambling with the safety and soundness of your SAP systems; which is a high stakes game to play.

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SAP HANA Security: Do You Want a Basic or Secure Implementation?

Different software companies take different approaches to the security of their products after they have been sold to their customers. Some would prefer it if previously released software had no security research attention paid to it where as others take a more realistic and therefore positive (to their customers) attitude. This positive approach is not only to provide their customers with security guidance for each component but to also release vulnerability information to them along with patches or remediation information in a regular and predictable way that allows their customers to anticipate and plan for application of remediation.

SAP falls into the positive camp; as well as releasing vulnerability information for HANA and other SAP components on the second Tuesday of every month they also publish security guidance for best practices to securely install and maintain HANA deployments.

Now, you could try and argue that the ultimate best practice is for SAP to release completely perfect and secure code and products; and to not allow their customers to reconfigure it so it can run in an insecure manor. That and unicorn hamburgers would be fantastic; but I am not holding my breath for either to present itself to me any time soon…

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